Answering some FAQs about Black Junction


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Awakening for Negroes-A Reply-LE(1)

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The African Renaissance Channel

Awakening for Negroes-A Reply-LE(1)


In this video, we responded to comments around the possible number of Negro slaves exported to what is today the United States. This is based on Prof Gates who cited the work of other Prof who clearly stated that their figures were estimates.
However only a limited version of the video is available on Youtube especially because we are no longer able to respond to comments due to YT censorship. Youtube Censors our comments/replies to users comments to a ridiculous extent that it makes it further easy to see the gang up they used for the slave trade.


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REFERENCES‌ ‌

Orr, C. W. J. (1911). The making of northern Nigeria. Macmillan and Company, Limited.
Buxton, T. F. (1840). The African Slave Trade, and Its Remedy. J. Murray.
M'Queen, J. (1840). A Geographical Survey of Africa: Its Rivers, Lakes, Mountains, Productions, States, Populations, &c. with a Map on an Entirely New Construction, to which is Prefixed a Letter to Lord John Russell Regarding the Slave Trade and the Improvement of Africa. Cass.
Tait, W. (1851)
Slave-trade overruled for the salvation of Africa: Volume 1
Sharp, G. (1772). An Appendix to the Representation:(printed in the Year 1769,) of the Injustice and Dangerous Tendency of Tolerating Slavery, Or of Admitting the Least Claim of Private Property in the Persons of Men in England. By Granville Sharp. London:: printed for Benjamin White, and Robert Horsefield [sic].
Smith, W. (1734). A new voyage to Guinea
Snelgrave, W. (1734). A New Account of Some Parts of Guinea: And the Slave-trade, Containing I. The History of the Late Conquest of the Kingdom of Whidaw by the King of Dahomè The Author's Journey to the Conqueror's Camp; where He Saw Several Captives Sacrificed, &c. II. The Manner how the Negroes Become Slaves. The Numbers of Them Yearly Exported from Guinea to America. The Lawfulness of that Trade. The Mutinies Among Them on Board the Ships where the Author Has Been, &c. III. A Relation of the Author's Being Taken by .... James, John, and Paul Knapton, at the Crown in Ludgate Street.

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